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brought wen to the miss america pageant, and turned pageant girls into wen girls. right now is the best time ever to give up your ordinary shampoo and try wen, because you can get 33 percent more cleansing conditioner and stay tuned to see how you can get the new wen travel kit absolutely free. this is our best deal ever. ♪ >> i'm sitting here with my friend chaz dean. chaz, so, i've been using wen for two years, right? and i just wanna say thank you, right off the bat-- >> you're welcome. >> --i just wanna thank you for my hair, because it was not like this before i started using wen. and, you know, being in the industry, they would fry my hair with, you know, with bad product, and using horrible irons. and it got so bad that i actually had to cut my hair off. >> i remember that. >> yeah. >> and people think you're doin' it--they probably think you're doin' it for the style, but they don't realize you're doing it 'cause of all the damage. >> exactly. >> and it's funny you say that, because i look back at all the celebrities that are out there on hit shows right now, and, if you watch
their government for redress, and to awaken america's long-slumbering conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages possessing a power and prophesy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose named never appeared in the history books, never got on tv. many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten and children fire hosed, and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormenters. in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonv
and the pursuit of happiness. it's obvious today that america has defaultsed on this promissory note in so far as her citizens of colors are concerned. although black americans had been given a bad check, it had come back marked insufficient funds, he had refused to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity in this nation. he said, we have come to cash this check. we think of that speech and that march as a singular event. and there is in fact nothing like it in our history. but it is less of a pillar and more like a peak, it is a summit that was reached. it was a moment in an ongoing movement that was well underway and not nearly over by the time that happened. and that march, and that speech like the campaign to desegregate the northwood theater in baltimore, and those protests with the terrifying consequences in america's georgia, that march was a tactic dreamed up in realtime by real imperfect people working together as a body in motion making incremental decisions about what to do next. about what might work. when we come back, we will be joined by the m
the one, fighting to be a part of america, and you see fearlessness in almost every state if you look. >> you were inspired because of what happened with trayvon martin? is that one of the reasons that somebody from their generation has become -- he was mentioned three our fortimes in different speeches, excluding by dr. king's sister. >> it was an alarm cloic for a lot of young people. then for the verdict to not go the way we had expected or plan i think set off a lot of young even. all i have to do is look around, but i do think that having someone that was our generation that looked just like us taken out of, you have the case of israel hernandez in miami, an artist just graffiti'ing an abandoned mcdonald's taken out. young people are starting to observe that hey, possibly the america we have today isn't the one we want tomorrow. >> interesting in 1963, obviously it was a lot of young people that came out that was the 8th anniversary of emmett till's slaying, but i have to play you this. at the end of the '63 march, they listed ten demands of things that they thought were importan
. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for the egyptian people. we don't take sides with any particular party or political figure. i know it's tempting inside of egypt to blame the united states or the west or some other outside actor for what's gone wrong. we've been blamed by supporters of morsi, we've been blamed by the other side as if we are supporters of morsi. that kind of approach will do nothing to help egyptians achieve the future that they deserve. >> reporter: and, thomas, while we are waiting for reaction to come in, i suspect part of what you'll hear are some lawmakers making the point this doesn't go far enough. we know senator john mccain has been consistently calling on the united states to pull back and to end the $1.3 billion in military aid that it sends to egypt every year. there are some democrats that have gotten on board with that as well. representative keith ellieson making that same point yesterday. bipartisan calls for the united states to take a much tougher stance of president obama continuing to get updated on the situation in egypt whi
-asaad must leave office. so where is america's credibility? >> reporter: the white house says the administration intends to declassify and release intelligence information. why the white house believes it was a chemical attack. bill: will he seek congressional authority before a military strike? >> reporter: the white house says it's consulting with congress as the war powers act requires. kings out of town for recess but one congressman says the president should do mow. he says the president should be making the case to the american public and his administration should come to congress to explain their plans. the consequences are too great for congress to be brushed aside. the president has been speaking with foreign leaders including british prime minister david cameron. they discussed possible consequences from the international community to syria. martha: we are told that the military assets are already in place when and if president obama does decide to order a strike. here is defense secretary chuck hagel speaking about this to the bbc. >> leaders all over the world said
secretary kerry to cairo. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for egyptian people ♪ there must be some kind of way out of here said the joker to the thief ♪ ♪ there's too much confusion >> good afternoon. we begin as the death toll from egypt's bloody crackdown continues to rise well into the hundreds now. as the extent of the military's assault on protesters comes into focus and the u.s. gauges its response to the bloodshed. at this hour, health officials report more than 600 dead and some 3,700 injured. figures that are yet expected to rise in the worst day of civil violence in the nation's modern history. but despite the brutal toll, muslim brotherhood supporters have ousted president morsi, urged demonstrators to take to the streets once more, vowing to bring down the interim government with mass protests today in cairo and to the north in alexandria. government buildings were set on fire in the city of guiza across the nile river from cairo. even if the interim government vowed to confront, quote, terrorist acts and officially authorize the use of live f
stands for every servant that serves america. the butler is you, you're serving america. the butler is me, i'm serving america through my cinema. and he happens to be looked down on. that's how we look at -- how we look at class, how we address class in america. which transcends race too. >> and you'll see martin bashir's full interview with lee daniels director of the butler" coming up in a few minutes. next the day's top lines. look who has a new appreciation for the performing arts. >> this is an artist. a very brave artist, believe it or not, rodeo clowns. they could he get mauled by a bull at any time. this is art, this is entertainment. a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. [ male
, particularly at bank of america. that failure rate recently, sources inside bank of america. the failure rate of that basic test. this is like, you know, apples and oranges. very basic stuff. if you want to be an investment banker you have to know basic things. first-year students that come out of the best schools, steady business. the failure rate from what we have from and source -- sources inside bank of america has grown from 30% last year to 40% this year. that is huge. we have heard from other sources of other banks that the failure rates have been increasing. now, they have one year to pass before they blow you out. this is kind of an interesting trend. i can tell you that before the 2008 financial crisis wall street was the place that everyone wanted to go, the best and brightest. a place where you made a lot of money. are you kind of felt good but yourself. what we're seeing now is the reverse trend in terms of recruiting. wall street according to the statistics is not getting the best recruits. they are getting, you know, a lower tier recruit, not across the board, based on the aver
a very important country not just in the middle east but to america and the west. and going up in flames by the look of it. this is a military coup d'etat, no other way of describing it. >> i think it also illustrates the great crisis in american diplomacy in the region, which is there are no good guys available for us to back. the muslim brotherhood are the primary people responsible for those 30 churches that our correspondent just reported on. the muslim brotherhood has been remarkably and openly anti-christian. and the regime was so narrow and so hostile that about 70% of the people of israel, the people of egypt indicated they wanted to replace them. so let's start with that simple fact that you have a bad government under the muslim brotherhood. none of us are particularly happy with the military coup but for an american perspective, may be the least dangerous and the most positive thing that happened. >> the reason that president obama is using that word is he wants to protect his legal position in the sense that if he does say that, then america will be duty bound to withdraw its
's the beginning. it's the beginning of a great moral crusade. to allow america do the unfinished work of american democracy. the congress has to act. >> by the forces of our demands, our determination and our numbers, we shall splitter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. >> we must say wake up, america, wake up, for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> bob dylan played his new song, only a pawn in their game, about the murder of metger evers. peter paul and mary all he formed. and then there was dr. martin luther king. spurred on by mahalia jackson who said, tell them about the dream. will be remembered as one of the most brilliant and important speeches in american history. >> let it ring. from every state and every city. we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men and white men, pros stents and catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old negro spiritual, free at last, free at last, thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> joining me now, congresswoman
it is america's weakness, we're showing we're afraid of al qaeda, closing embassies. on the other hand, god forbid another attack happens and we weren't prepared and didn't vacate some people and heard these threats, a lot of us at this table would say we should have closed embassies. we have assets and fast response teams in spain, bahrain, italy, the marine expeditionary unit in the middle east ready to go. this is clearly by the size and scope of it, 21 embassies, 4 consulates, the scope of this tells you there's a credible threat. this is going to be something that they believe in nature, al qaeda and arabian peninsula likely. maybe it wasn't a bad idea to close some of these. >> it does, andrea, seem overbroad. maybe they have reason to because they have enough chatter to know something is going on, not sure, perhaps it is a way to draw out the terrorists, trying to figure out, pinpoint who it is. >> i hope that's it. it is one of two things. one, the threat is credible, it is serious, and the reason for the silence could be that this administration just a couple weeks ago during memor
are in the context of higher education and opportunity in america in general. our official ideology, of course, here in the united states, is level playing field, but we want a level playing field that will select the people we think should be winning the race. joining me now is randall kennedy, professor of law at harvard university. author of the book "for discrimination: race, affirmative action and the law" which comes out next month. professor kennedy, did the results of this study surprise you? >> no, it didn't surprise me. after all, people will often favor the policy that is good for them and their group. so it shouldn't be any surprise that there would be some white people who would downgrade, let's say, grade point average or test scores if those in merit aren't working in their favor. >> we often think of the debate over affirmative action in a kind of battle over a zero sum fixed pie of educational resources, as involving white people and black people, or white people and black or brown people. one of the things i thought was interesting about this study was it looked at this group that
war and what will it mean for america? >>> gone to pot, america's marijuana obsession. i'll talk to people on both sides of the issue that got this country fired up. you heard dr. sanjay gupta say this about his u-turn on marijuana. >> if you look at the papers written in the united states about marijuana, the vast majority are about harm. we fund studies on harm. we don't fund studies on benefit so it gives a distorted picture. >>> the man that wants to thank him personally for changing his mind on weed. medical marijuana user montel williams and an angry debbie row testifies about drug use and hanna anderson speaks out online days after her rescue. why she says she will never forgive herselves for the deaths of her mother and brother and other fascinating information. >>> egypt in uproar. at least 278 killed across the country in one day, the worst bloodshed since the revolution that toppled moe bar rick. what happens when the sun comes up is anybody's guess. there are fears the death toll could go much, much higher. arwa damon is live in cairo. terrible day in egypt, a sense o
that there are states in america now that have fully legalized the use of marijuana but for recreational and medical use. are you tempted to take vivian out of new jersey and go somewhere like colorado, for example, where it's all completely legal? >> absolutely. it's a decision that we discuss every single day. we actually decided after christie's announcement on friday that we were going to give ourselves this week to not talk about it, regroup, and then see where we are next week. but a year is a year of seizures and only if we have to move their temporarily to get vivian on the treatment as soon as possible, that's what we'll do. we're not going to stop at anything to help our daughter. >> and how is she at the moment, would you say, brian? >> today she was pretty good. yesterday she had a bad day. every day it's very intermittent. sometimes she'll have a good day, partial day. right now she's doing good because she's upstairs sleeping in her crib. >> she's a moody 2-year-old. ask us by the minute how she's doing. some days are better than others. we like that actually because that's a normal side t
player. >> he's got the ball. >> that astroturf. >> thank you for joining us everybody. america live starts right now. >> bye bye. >>> woe begin with a fox news alert. brand new fox news poll numbers to talk about today. americans appear to be tuning out the president's message on fixing the economy. welcome to "america live" everyone. i'm alisyn camerota in for megyn kelly. weekly applications for unemployment rise. the four-week average has fallen to the lowest level in almost six years. we'll break down all of those numbers, including the fine print for you. this comes in the middle of the series of campaign-style features that president obama has been making across the country. selling his economic plan and calling republicans in congress the obstacles to true progress. >> now, unfortunately for the last year or so, we've had an endless parade of distractions and political posturing and phony scandals that shift focus away from what do we need to do to shore up middle class families and create ladders of opportunity for folks to get in the middle class? and as washington hea
. >> we'll see. >> thanks for joining us, america live starts right now. >> and we begin with a fox news alert. we are just getting word that american war ships are on the move as the obama administration comes under increasing pressure for military intervention for syria i am shannon in for megyn kelliy. secretary of state kelly will be making a statement at 2 o'clock p.m. eastern and the white house briefing will be pushed back to cover the news on syria united nation's inspectors were shot at going to the site of the last week's chemical attack. the inspectors were trying to do the work walking through the town and speaking with survivors and taking samples from victims. there are many. these photos tell the story. the bodies of dozens of innocent children laid out and covered with she'ds. hundreds of people are believed to have died in the attack. men, women and children, an estimated 100,000 people have died since the start of the conflict. the obama administration has possessioned four destroyers off of the coast of syria. we are told that the ships are close enough to launch a mis
which america could take military action in syria this as calls grow to forcefully respond to evidence that the assad regime killed hundreds of its own people with chemical weapons. >>> the wildfire the size of the chicago raging in and around a cherished american landmark, the yosemite national park but the rim fire poses a threat to hundred of thousands of residents in san francisco and it is a 150 miles away. we'll tell you about that. >>> sentencing for the army major convicted of killing 13 people in the fort hood shooting massacre the will nidal hasan get life in prison or the death penalty. but first right now, brand new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good
some malicious thing against the president and it appears he's quite sincere. bill: i think america needs another beer. 26 past. growing talk after military strike against syria. will american cruise missiles be enough to achieve the objective and what should that objective be? martha: folks in one town a bit on edge. the unwanted guest that has been staying indoors. >> i ran out of the house. it was real scary. i said imnever going back there again. help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. martha: the obama administration is saying it's ready to act against syria if the president gives the green light for that action after declaring there is undeniable evidence syria launched a
cover story. >> asian carp, mussels from europe, burmese pythons. they're more than making it in america. >> wow. reporter: their numbers are exploding with devastating results. >> and when scientists look into the future, they see the potential for many more damaging species. >> reporter: you make it sound like we're under attack everywhere. >> we are under attack everywhere. >> reporter: invasive species, the natural order completely up in the air. later on sunday morning. >> osgood: actor brian cranston seems to have found just the right formula for a varied and successful career. this morning he'll be walking lee cowan through it step by step. >> from jerry seinfeld's debatist. >> all right. it is cavity time. >> reporter: to the dad in malcolm in the middle. being a work-a-day actor is all he ever wanted. but now brian cranston has fans addicted to a meth-making high school chemistry teacher. >> i wanted to do some good work. and what happened was beyond my wildest dreams. >> reporter: the not so bad life of "breaking bad"'s brian cranston ahead on sunday morning. >> osgood: singer
. >> these people have the best health care coverage in america, people in administration on capitol hill give themselves everything. of course they don't want to go to something. >> you know what, they are not the only people that feel this way. look at the union. you know what the health bill is? you ever go to the gas station late at night and that rotating machine of hot dogs and that one hot dog, that is the health care bill. everybody looks at the hot doll and they go i'm not eating that hot dog. >> you take it. >> i do take it but for other reasons. health care is hated by everybody and nobody wants to admit it. obama nominated john as the new head of the irs. he is an expert in turning this institution around because it is in need of reform. why would you need reform if it was a phony scandal. apparently, it is not a phony scandal. calling the irs a phony scandal is like calling ariel castro a misunderstood boyfriend. >> i think i liked you better with the shades yesterday. >> shutup. >> here is the deal. the union will help get obama care pushed through. now they don't want to be part
. heather hughs back with us from sun america funds. rebecca paterson. leo kelly. and our own rick santelli. leo kelly, earlier as we were closing, i reported that sources saying that there is another massive multibillion dollar etf going on on the street today. they are selling treasuries to buy mid cap etf equities. that's one of the reasons we saw the move-in rates. what's your take of selling treasuries to buy mid cap equities? >> if you're a long term investor and long-term player, treasuries are a difficult play. the interest rates are going to go higher. if you look at the fed, they are still in crisis mode. it still amazes me. we have 0% interest rates and we are still buying billions of dollars of asset backed mortgages like we're still in crisis when in fact the economy is recovering. it is not recovering fast but it is recovering. so i think bonds long-term -- >> are you recommending treasuries or equities? >> no. we are not recommending treasuries. we are still bearish on long-term treasury possess. we like equities in long-term but you have to just stay disciplined here and not
to the americas, but creatures that will die rather than in retreat. >> title date we will stop the spread of the african bees. >> moving through florida headed for georgia. killer bees now number more than 1 trillion and will soon be headed your way. john: whatht are we going to do? let's ask this man who is on the animal planet show the removal specialists, a mike mollica burger should we be scared of the killer bees? >> i would not be any more afraid than being struck by lightning. john: but they are investing in moving north? >> when they were released from brazil in 1957 they spread at a rate to 300 miles per year. john: and experimental went wrong? >> they were taken from africa and brought to brazil to create a better be to more resistant to the pathogens a create better honey and it was an accidental release from one of the assistance that allowed these into the of wild where they spread rapidly nooth in six states right now. john: there more dangerous because they don't is -- get discouraged and will chase you furthhr? period this is true in the measurement compared to the europea
and also incredibly public and inspirational for the public. those were the kind of principles that america was built on. for king to continue that narrative and really bring us into the 21st century is the sort of model of a more equal america, that really, for me, is the staying power and it's something that we're all still trying to achieve. >> yeah. it's a fabulous work that you put together. i could have spent the whole day playing around with it. one of the quotes to underscore what jonathan is saying about the broad reach of dr. king's speech is a quote from malala, human rights activist in pakistan, and she says that his legacy is that those words reached far beyond america's shores and the generation that he spoke about. 50 years beyond the oration, i have a dream, too. we know how profound the impact has been. how is the speech viewed and how was it covered in the context of those times? >> well, it's a fascinating story we learned from interviewing clarence jones. not only was the dream part improvised on that day, he has talked about -- he had given that i have a dream earlier i
a to b. we still, though, are the greatest country in the world and what america thinks and does is important. i know that people there are watching our actions, i don't think that we should be anything more than a strong sense of come coming any less than a strong sense of calm. but our leverage is different. and yet at the same time, the leverage that we have, we should use. people still care, we're working with saudi arabia and the emirates right now on issues in syria. so the things we end up having effects more than just the aid. there's no question the monetary part of this is minuscule compared to what's being supplanted by these other countries. but we still have influence. we need to use it as much as we can. but we cannot wave a magic wand and i think sometimes people react in ways that just are not thoughtful when people do things that are counter to what we think as good policy in these countries. certainly we should react and we should react in a measured way. and we don't have all the cards and i know it's frustrating to americans, but we need to be patient, we need
on in egypt to what happened in latin america and in the sort of dirty wars in argentina and chile and how that effectively destabilized a region and it had an antiamerican stance, the legacy we feel today. you look at hugo chavez and where edward snowden was trying to flee. i wonder if you think that's possibly what could happen in parts of the middle east? >> sure. you can go around the world and look at regions where the united states has backed authoritarian regime. once the regions fall, there's no lack of american hostility whether we talk about iran, latin america or other countries that have had this experience. there's no question that what's happening now will not be good for america's standing, not only in egypt but throughout the region. >> thank you. foreign affairs magazine jonathan tapperman. tamara oliver fbi from human rights watch. thank you all and ayman mohyeld mohyeldin. >>> ted cruz has a new message for republicans on the fence about shutting down the government. don't blink. we'll have the details coming up next. ♪ i'm a hard, hard worker every day. ♪ ♪ i'm a
a military strike. >> what we have been told is there's evidence that america, the british, the french say they have, is going to be shared with us. we will be very, very, very interested in hearing from them what this evidence they have is. >> he also said any military action should be authorized by a u.n. resolution. problem is is there's almost no chance that a resolution will pass. we expect the u.s., britain and france will support it. russia and china almost certainly won't. members of this administration have been reaching out to their international counterparts. in the last four days, you've had the president reaching out to leaders of can that, australia, france and the uk. we kind of know the usual suspects in a u.s.-led coalition. all in an effort to show the level of consultations going on. also released the list calls made by the vice president, secretary of defense, chairman of the joint chiefs, the u.n. ambassador and secretary of state. secretary kerry alone has made 47 calls to foreign leaders over the last week. among the ones that got the most attention, russian foreign
not get back to anybody else in america. and she's hiding everything that she can. >> that was the anger and frustration she feels. but what amazed me from talking to the other family members who lost their children, who lost their siblings is just they just want answers. and they don't want this to be political. it seems obvious we need more answers. it also seems obvious this shouldn't be about the finger pointing and blame game going on in washington. i want to let all your viewers know, people can go to our blog because these families have foundations, ways to try to help to make sure this doesn't happen again. i hope people will go to those foundation websites and learn more about the families. >> you've spent a lot of time on this story. you put together a great team for tonight's special. what's the biggest takeaway you take from this documentary? >> reporte >> one of the things that amazed me the most, could this be prevented? the answer to that question is yes. we'll talk to one of the men who briefed chris stevens on security. his takeaway, the americans knew there were all the
the people of america what our health care alternative is and we've yet to do that. >> bob, there's no accountability as we've been saying about other issues because of hyper partisan districts. if i'm a gop member of the house and rail against obama care and say let's defund the government, et cetera, et cetera, and maybe public surveys across the country say that individual is out of step, chances are they're not out of step in their own district. >> i think that's true. one of the problems the republican party has now is that it rode the tea party to power in the house in 2010 and now stuck with all those people. i think john is largely right about what sensible republicans want to do. i'm not sure he's right about the ways out. but you have a whole group of folks who might just take this over the cliff. if boehner holds to the rule that he has to have a majority of the majority before he'll bring anything to the floor, you might just have a government shutdown. and sensible people in the republican party like john brabender, carl row think this is a train wreck for the gop. it
in time all america can really do is ask for restraint on both sides. certainly keep our fingers crossed that the bloodshed will end and that the military will respect human rights. >> if we wait and we keep our fingers crossed and we ask for restraint, u.s. officials as we understand until the very last minute before this crackdown were reaching out to their counterparts in egypt asking for that very restraint but they were ignored. so do we have an influence? keeping fingers crossed doesn't seem like it is going to cut it anymore. >> no, it's tragic we don't have greater influence. about the only thing we have right now is the threat of cutting out military aid. quite honestly, a number of us in the senate were willing to give the president the flexibility prior to the august recess. when we come back in september if events don't improve dramatically, i don't think there is going to be any choice than to basically force the hand of this administration and cut off military aid to egypt. >> should he have made that call today? should hathat have been the decision now? >> first, i don't t
football. i want to expand early childhood education so it's accessible for every young person in america. we are going to have to prepare for a different energy future than the one we have right now. >> nbc's kristen welker is traveling with the president. kristen, the vice president will also be joining him next hour as well. >> hey, abby. good afternoon. that is right. we are on the bus right now headed to that final stop in scranton. this will be the first time we will see vice president biden since he spent the past week in houston with his son beau biden, who is being treated there at a houston medical center. he was released. we should say that, and is in good spirit and good health right now. vice president biden will be at president obama's side for this final stop on this college affordability tour, if you want to call it that. of course, the optics are going to get a lot of buzz. this is the vice president's hometown, scranton. this is biden country. he's very popular there. so you can bet that there's going to be a lot of buzz about 2016 in the wake of this event. certainly th
, please welcome the president of the pga of america from the legends golf club in franklin, indiana, ted bishop. >> thank you, bill. first of all, i would like to say thanks to all of the members of the oak hill country club, the spectators that traveled from near and far. thousands of volunteers made this a great success and worldwide tv viewing audience that made it a spectacular pga hampionship. now on behalf of everyone associated with the pga of america we would like to recognize our champion, the winner of the season's final major presenting the historic wanamaker trophy. this has to be sweet redemption for a guy that lost a tough playoff defeat in atlanta. he set a 72 hole major championship scoring record here at oak hill. the 2013 champion, jason dufner. >> congratulations. you are always so calm on the outside. but something tells me there is a good party on the inside right now. >> it is a tough day. it is a long day. tough golf course. probably hasn't hit me yet. i can't believe this is happening to me. you know to come back from a couple of years ago in this championship wh
our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> celebrity therapist dr. phil mcgraw is in a bit of hot water over this twice asking -- if a girl is drunk, is it okay to have sex with her? reply yes or no to dr. phil with the #teamsaccused. dr. phil's show says it was intended to invoke discussion, but it ended up doing something very different. >>> so let's bring in torrie dunnen with the details. torrie, this is very upsetting to a lot of people. you this was quickly deleted, but the storm of reaction had already started. we did get a statement from the dr. phil show clarifying this was not a personal post from dr. phil. we are told he is upset and deleted it the second he saw it. the show apologized saying the question was ill-advised be it drugs, alcohol, age or mental ill
, america became more free and more fair. america changed for you and for me. [ bells tolling ] >> reporter: moments before the president spoke, bells rang out across the u.s. to commemorate the moment in 1963 when dr. king uttered his famous phrase. >> as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom. >> reporter: among the thousands in washington was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with t
: in fact america filled 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills last year alone. we are among the most sleep medicated countries in the word. >> we are a 24 hour a day country. we are always on demand. >> reporter: evidence of the widespread use is prevalent on face book where people post "can't fall asleep. taking my ambien. lights out y'all. and ambien, i got to agree that i have a love/hate thing with you. i'm talking to a doctor about getting off of you. >> you have people that come to you and say i want to get off of this. >> all the time. the majority of the patients i see. >> reporter: not being able to sleep can be a curse, affecting a person's ability to function. research shows sleep aid do work, allowing us to catch much needed zs. is a drug-induced sleep just as good as falling asleep the old-fashioned way. >> a lot of people feel it is real sleep. a lot of people don't feel the sleep quality is good. >> reporter: the doctor points out only a limited number of studies looked at long term effects of chronic use. that is something people don't lose sleep over as they. pop ano
. welcome here to "america's newsroom." you have come back for more. >> i decided to try another day. i'm heather childers in for martha maccallum. snowden has been in limbo at the moscow airport since june 20 third. the u.s. wanted russia to send him back home to face prosecution for spilling secrets about the u.s. surveillance program. instead russia granted him a year of asylum. bill: we wonder what is next. greg palkot live in london. there are a lot of rumors that he could go to cuba or venezuela. what is the latest there, greg. >> reporter: hello, bill and heather. by our calculations about an hour 1/2 ago he left his limbo status there at the terminal at the moscow airport. edward snowden the nsa leaker, is now traveling into russia. traveling to an undisclosed location according to his lawyer. indisclosed because of security concerns. he also, we have just learned, traveling with a member of the wikileaks organization, the whistle-blower organization assisting him in all of his various travels. this refugee status allows him to live and work in the country for one year and then,
the capable and is gathering information on every phone call made in america, you're concerned how that could be used not just by the government but by individuals working for the government, and by somebody who all of a sudden may decide to politically target people. that's a legitimate concern. so, again, i'm not -- i don't think we should trivialize the debate beyond the personalities involved. it's a very significant balancing act. these are important programs. we have to be able to do some of this and figure out how to do it in a way that americans have more conversation, and a lot of that starts by leadership. when you have reports that the irs targeted americans that undermines the confidence. >> neil: up sos like you're slightly more to the side of the libertarian thinking on this. protect us bus not at the expense of going too far. >> i think we have to be able to do both. >> neil: i understand that. the reason why i even mention it is that there's been some shifting on your part, or so it would appear, on a couple of key issues, from immigration reform to obamacare and maybe defundi
want to die in america that has breast cancer so that we're on a par with the english system? it will all be equalized, so everybody will be getting less than the health care they would get without obama care. >> everybody will be getting less? really even the 45 million people who have no health insurance at all? lord, what fools these mortals be. let's get to our panel. here in new york city is joy reid, the managing editor of thegrio.com. david corn, and also msnbc policy analyst, the great ezra klein of "the washington post." joy, i apologize for comparing british parliamentary history with speaker boehner, but there was the parliament of dunces in 1404, when lawyers were banned. then there was the adult parliament of 1614. has speaker boehner managed to -- the addled and the dunces umpgts and then throw in the do-nothing congress that we had in this fair country. i think the funniest part was the part in the introwhen they said they were going on recess. i had no idea they were actually there. they don't do anything. they may as well. >> this is their summer recess. the
to ramadan. >> why do they have affiliates going after america? what's the hallmark that al qaeda could be behind the threats? >> they have shown the desire and ability to go after u.s. targets abroad. they were behind the plot that the cia thwarted a year ago. they're also believed to be behind those cargo packages that were shipped to chicago synagogues with exemployeesive material. that group has shown the ability and desire to attack targets overseas. that's what the intelligence is pointing. >> jill, what can people do? how can they protect themselves sns. >> they have to be very ware of their surroundings. they have to know that the american embassieembassies, the post-closures. you can go on to the website of the state department and find them. those embassies and consulates will be closed. in emergencies they might be able to provide something but you're not going to ghet there. one of the reasons the state department is pointing out is they do not want people and this would be foreign nationals standing in line waiting to get visas. it could be an invitation for a potential att
suspended recently are from latin america. >> rafael explains why this is significant when it comes to the use of performance enhancing drugs. >> reporter: at this baseball academy in dominican republic, this future of baseball is literally in the making. these young players have a common dream, to make it in the major leagues. they have something else in common. they all idolize alex rodriguez and are devastated by his suspension. >> translator: it's tough for us dominicans and difficult. we're talking about one of the greatest players. a star that shines no longer. to retire the name is something that's very sad for us. >> reporter: rodriguez born in new york to dominican parents was suspend monday for 211 regular season games amid allegations using performance enhancing drugs. 12 other players agreed to 50 game suspension without pay. the only nonhispanic in the group got a 65-game suspension. he and rodriguez are the only suspended players not born in latin america. >> they're all either from the dominican republic. they invest billions of dollars in baseball academies in latin
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